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Making Self-Care a Priority

Originally published March 2008. Revised for February 2021

 

We recently resurrected an article we wrote in 2008 about making self-care a priority. Interestingly, many of the concepts we wrote about in the 2008 financial crisis are still applicable today with a few updates.

 

There is a concept in the coaching world called "extreme self-care." Coined by coaching guru Thomas Leonard, extreme self-care is putting yourself at the top of your list and spending your time on the things you want to do. Unlike plain old selfishness, extreme self-care doesn't have a negative impact on others. It goes back to that old analogy of the oxygen masks on the airplane — you have to put yours on before helping others with theirs.

 

If you have the courage to do some of the things we suggest to make your self-care a priority, then you will have the power to be of service to others, and there will be a direct impact on your bottom line. This is especially important in a period of prolonged stress like we have had for the better part of the past year.

 

It can be difficult in times like these when everyone is clamoring for our attention from our children, spouses, parents, clients and team members. With so many relying on us, it is even more important to take some time for ourselves.

 

Here are some practical reminders to get you started:

 

Have a clear vision.

Get a specific idea of where you want to go. Create a one- and three-year vision for your business and your life and write it down. Imagine it is December 31, 2021 — what does your life and business look like? Just as you advise your clients to write down their goals, you will be much more successful if you do, too. Sharing your vision with your team can also bring you together towards a common goal to help your clients get through challenging times.

 

Be true to your values.

Make sure you are operating from your values. If you look at your to-do list for the day, are you spending time on what is really important to you? With the change for many to working from home it can be easy for our work life to have no end time. It is much easier to say "no" to things you do not really want to do if you are true to your values. By sharing these values with your clients, it is easier to set boundaries and expectations about when you will respond to them.

 

Make time for what's important.

Have a look at the rest of the year and schedule in personal things of utmost importance first, such as time spent on family, healthcare, relationships and professional development. Even though we may not be able to travel right now, it is still important to book some time away from the office. One advisor we coach decided to delete social media applications from his phone as he found it was taking away from being in the moment when he was with his family. Another found that by working one or two days a week from home he was able to take a break during the middle of the day to get out for some fresh air with his family and was much more productive when getting back to work.

 

Free yourself from the nagging to-dos.

You cannot move forward with growing your business until you clear up things that are holding you back. In many cases with our clients, blocking a day to clean up a cluttered office has ultimately led to an increase in business. Set aside some time and get rid of those nagging to-dos once and for all. A first step can even be doing a “mind dump” on paper of everything you have on your plate at the moment. Then you can identify priorities, and items that could be delegated to others.

 

Practice what you preach about finances.

Are you doing the things you advise your clients to do? We see many advisors so focused on their business that they have neglected their own finances. If you take care of this piece for yourself, you will become a much more effective advisor. If we do have an extended downturn or recession what will the impact be on your business? Some teams took advantage of government support for businesses this year and focused on building up cash reserves in case their revenues are impacted in the longer term.

 

Leverage support systems.

Do you have an adequate support system in place? It is important to have someone to talk to about the challenges of your business. This can be a manager, coach, mentor or study group. If you are feeling extreme levels of stress or depression, it may be time to talk to a professional therapist.

 

Keep extra reserves in the tank.

Right now, it may feel like the concept of "life balance" is unattainable. That’s ok. It is often said that it is in difficult times that financial advisors earn their pay cheques. It is important to focus on your financial, physical and mental reserves that are built up by taking care of yourself even if it is only starting at a few minutes a day. Just like our mothers told us, getting enough sleep, eating healthy, and moving our bodies each day all make a difference.

 

To summarize, part of the idea of extreme self-care is having the mindset that what you are doing is what you choose to do versus have to do. By doing this, you will find it easier to focus on growing your business and attracting new clients. And you will be better able to make an impact on your clients' lives, which is one of the key reasons you joined this great industry in the first place.

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Effective team meetings

Originally published Oct 2014. Revised in February 2021. 

 

Effective Team Meetings

 

“Meetings are indispensable when you don’t want to do anything.” 

- John Kenneth Galbraith

 

Many people share Mr. Galbraith’s view of meetings – they are often seen as a waste of time and they can be if not structured properly. When you have a team of two or more people however, meetings are a key part of effective communication in an office.

 

Here are some tips to make your meetings a more productive use of your time: 

 

1) Have a set time for your team meetings and schedule them in your calendar for the year. For example, day long annual planning meeting, quarterly team meetings and weekly meetings. If you are doing virtual meetings, plan them in 2-hour spans to avoid zoom fatigue.

 

2) Find a day of the week and time of day when energy levels are high. Tuesday morning meetings often work well. Consider each team member's convenience. 

 

3) Have an agenda for every meeting with a clear outcome. If you like a sample, let us know.

 

5) Set a time limit for meetings so people stay on point.

 

6) Build in team accountability. You can use a worksheet or shared to-do list which has key responsibilities, time frames and have each team member report on their own items to ensure everyone is involved.

 

7) Hold the meeting even if the whole team isn’t there. Even if the lead advisor is away, the remaining team members should still get together to touch base on things.

 

8) Have someone record minutes even if only in point form.

 

9) Add some variety (i.e. guest speaker on a topic that is relevant to the group, training on software, or watching a short TED talk). 

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Advisors in Growth Mode

Advisors are back in growth mode and building up their teams

 

BY HELEN BURNETT-NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

UPDATED DECEMBER 16, 2020

 

If you have a Globe and Mail account you can view the article here. 

 

Otherwise, see below for key takeaways. 

 

Volatility and uncertainty during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic brought a forced pause to the year’s plans for most Canadians and businesses – financial advisors included. But several advisors have chosen to shift back into growth mode carefully in recent months as client demand has put their plans for strategic long-term expansion come back into focus.

 

April-Lynn Levitt, a business coach for financial advisors with The Personal Coach in Oakville, Ont., says that while many of her advisor clients were initially waiting to gauge the impact of the pandemic on revenue and growth, several have added team members over the past few months. She says advisors have shifted from reactive to proactive mode as demand from clients increases.

 

Many advisors were surprised by the success of the virtual model with both existing and new clients and see this as an opportunity to grow strategically, focusing on where they need to augment their service offering, Ms. Levitt says.

 

“If you have the mindset that, ‘Yes, we can do business this way in this new environment,’ then those type of advisors have been really exceeding,” she says.

 

The virtual nature of business at the moment should not prevent firms from bringing on extra team members as long as expansion makes sense strategically and financially, Ms. Levitt says.

 

At the same time, expanding an advisory firm successfully in the COVID-19 era requires clarity and communication beyond what may have been necessary previously, as the face-to-face component of bringing a new team member on board is missing, she says.

 

“It’s even more important to have all the things you would have in a normal hiring process, like a very clear job description and responsibilities, a very clear onboarding process and training schedule,” Ms. Levitt says.

 

Please connect if you have any questions about growing in 2021!

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'Tis the Season for Business Planning

'Tis the Season for Business Planning 

 

Recharge your business in 2021

 

Do you have a business plan? Better yet, would you say it's comprehensive; having strategies, vision, goals with action plans and timelines? 

So why plan? Well, simply put, what gets written down gets remembered, what gets scheduled gets completed, what gets measured gets improved! Also consider how business planning efforts will help your clients achieve their goals.

 

To start, complete a Year-End Review and ask yourself the following questions. Don't forget to get your team involved. 

 

1. What were our goals in 2020 and did we achieve them?

2. What went really well this year? 

3. What was missing last year or needed to be improved?

4. What were the opportunities and challenges?

5. What were the pain points?

6. How can we do more for our clients?

7. How can we do more for our team? 

 

Keep in mind that an effective plan:

  • Is dynamic and should be adjusted when necessary
  • Is simple to understand
  • Includes quantifiable tasks
  • Is reviewed regularly
  • Holds you and your team accountable

 

Contact us to book a complimentary call

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What are advisors doing now

What's Next for Advisors with Julie Littlechild from Absolute Engagement

 

Give yourself a break from reading and listen to our insightful video instead. 

 

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Shifting Gears

 

From a degree in Geology to a career as a Business Consultant later a Financial Advisor, Sandra Schmidt has always been a master of change. Now, she embraces her most recent endeavor - retirement.

 

A native of London, Ontario, Sandra describes her upbringing as akin to a Norman Rockwell painting. The third of four girls, Sandra, reflects on her childhood as warm and loving. Her father was an actuary with London Life and her mother, trained as a teacher, chose to be a stay-at-home mom, as did many of that generation. Attending church was a big part of Sandra’s childhood, given that her father was a soloist in the choir, and her mother ran the Sunday school. Mostly, Sandra recalls both parents always encouraging their daughters to find their passion, to do it well and to remember that in life, there are no limitations – you can do anything you choose.

 

Inspired by her parents’ words, after Sandra graduated from high school she followed her father’s example and attended university at Western. There she received her Bachelor’s degree in Geology. A short stint in the Arctic, however, convinced Sandra that spending over half of each year in remote locations wasn’t all that appealing. She decided that a business education might be a path to consider and returned to Western, this time as a student in the Business program. It is here she met the love of her life, Duff Schmidt,

who hailed from the Okanagan in British Columbia. By January of the following year, the couple knew wherever they would go; they would go together. When asked how they decided between British Columbia and Ontario, Sandra says, “Duff said he wanted to be where the skiing was, so

away we went to Vancouver!”

 

Almost directly out of school, Duff started with Mutual Life in the Estate and Financial Planning Services (EFPS) area. Sandra accompanied him to various corporate events and conventions, and it was there she began to notice the

opportunities available in the financial services industry. Through the years, Sandra continued to develop close relationships with management at the local branch of what is now Sun Life Financial, who would consistently tell her,

“When you get tired of what you’re doing, come and work for us.” Fast forward five years, Sandra knew it was time for a change and left her role in Strategic Planning consulting and in June 2000, her career as a Financial Advisor began.

 

Though a logical and natural transition, Sandra describes the first few years as an Advisor being “really tough.” Similar to what most advisors experience, Sandra also quickly exhausted her natural market. Prospecting was tough and, in need of people to talk to, she developed a game plan that was strategic and proactive. Scouring her Rolodex, Sandra approached individuals who were well-placed HR managers and could get her in the door for a 45-minute “workplace solutions” presentation. Attendance was high during these

sessions, and Sandra’s genuine approach and willingness to invest her time with clients resonated well and served as a foundation for her future success. At that time, the Financial Centre offered a mentorship program that paired new advisors with more tenured campaigners. It was during this program where Sandra met Al. Al not only served as Sandra’s mentor but soon became her friend and eventual business partner. In 2005, with the

partnership flourishing, they moved to a new location in downtown Vancouver.

 

In 2008, Al was approaching retirement and in the early stage of his succession plan, which included transitioning out of the individual business. Sandra had already been helping to service many of Al’s clients over the past several years; still, the formal transition was a significant change and Sandra felt that she needed some additional guidance and support. She reached out to a colleague who had been in a similar situation who referred her to The Personal Coach. Sandra says she has always treated her business like a business, but working with Juli Leith offered her a very different perspective on how best to organize, structure and manage her practice. This new relationship eventually led to an even higher level of success for Sandra. “Working with Juli ensured that I didn’t simply double how hard I worked just

because I had doubled my business” Sandra reflects. With her business bustling, ensuring her work-life balance became an even more significant challenge and necessity. At the end of each busy day, Sandra would come home, kick off her heels and sit on the floor in the kitchen and talk to her dog, Molly. “I would tell her all about my day - she won’t share my secrets.” Sandra’s business would continue to grow and flourish and the next 11 years flew by.

 

During the summers, Sandra and Duff would take some much-needed downtime to recharge their batteries. In 2017, Sandra found that she was growing increasingly less enthusiastic about returning to work. That’s when she knew it was time to start thinking about and planning for her succession strategy. Sandra’s daughter, Leigh, had worked for Sandra’s team as a summer student while studying business at the University of Victoria. Also, Leigh had covered a year of maternity leave for one of the staff. When asked if she would consider becoming an advisor, Leigh replied: “no thanks” – déjà vu from when Sandra was first asked! Leigh and her husband John followed their dreams and moved to New Zealand for two years for John to pursue a degree in winemaking. After returning to Canada, they settled in the Okanagan wine region, and Leigh decided the timing was right and pursued a career as a Sun Life Advisor. She has since taken on Sandra’s Okanagan clients as well as Lower Mainland clients Leigh was already supporting. The balance of her business transferred to colleagues whom Sandra had worked with for years. Citing as the vital element to choosing a successor, “We  already had a great rapport, I knew who they were and what their values were. I knew my clients would receive the same level of integrity and respect

as I had shown them”. Sandra is so proud of Leigh and the Vancouver advisors. After her clients had moved to their respective new advisors, Sandra stayed on for three months to ensure it was a smooth transition. In May of 2019, Sandra officially retired. She has since run into former clients and receives emails and cards saying thank you for picking such great advisors to carry on the legacy.

 

Receiving accolades from her clients isn’t surprising. You only have to hear Sandra speak about her time as an advisor to understand how she cherished the relationships she built. She had several families where she serviced four generations! In her own words, Sandra shares, “It is such a privilege and

honor to participate in a small way in a family’s life – and with such an intimate topic. To be a steward is such an honor”. Reflecting on one family in particular, Sandra can’t help but become emotional. In 2004, the file of two clients was passed on to her - a husband and wife. Eventually, she gained the business of his mother, and then their children and grandchildren, too. One year, Sandra noticed a change with the wife; that she didn’t seem herself. It was then, when the client was in her early 50’s, that she received a diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer’s. Amid this turmoil, it was comforting that the planning work done with Sandra allowed the husband to take his retirement early to care for his wife up until her passing. When asked what her guiding principle is, Sandra humbly shares, “you must have a solid sense of what is right and wrong. Be kind to one another and do the right thing. Show up when you’re supposed to show up and mostly, be the advisor you’d like to have”. What started as an attraction to business turned into a genuine love for people. “I had no idea how much I would fall in love with the clients. It was never about me; it was always about them”. For anyone thinking about becoming an advisor, Sandra shares the following sage advice “be prepared for the roller coaster. It’s not easy, and there are two tracks on the roller coaster; emotional and financial – they go hand in hand. Know what an honor it is. Clients will tell you things they won’t share with others; it’s all about trust”.

 

“What we do as advisors matters.”

 

Since May, Sandra has been enjoying every moment of retirement. She reflects, “I used to hear from retired people and they would tell me how busy they were, and I wondered, how can they be so busy? I don’t wonder that anymore!” With Duff also retiring in the Fall of 2018, their days are spent

enjoying the outdoors, loving time with their expanding family, reconnecting with friends, traveling and truly living in the present.

 

Sandra, on behalf of The Personal Coach, congratulations on a magnificent career and your retirement!
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There's Still Time to Amplify!

 
 
Finishing The Year Strong. It's Not Too Late To Amplify Results!

 

 

It’s hard to believe we’re already at the end of September and the end of the third business quarter as well. A common theme for September is that it offers a fresh perspective - or a “new year”. Everyone is back from summer holidays, the kids are back to school, and it’s time to reflect on how the year has gone, and how you want it to end.

 

So, how are you doing? This question can be daunting for most advisors to answer because, even if one aspect of your business is thriving, there could be other factors that are demanding your attention and pulling you away from your preferred focus. Also, if we’re frank, most advisors don’t spend enough time working on their business to develop systems for a routine review and to strategize for the future. This realization means you are not equipped to overcome unexpected challenges causing business growth to stall. It can also lead to frustration, stress, and stagnation. Look at the visual below and apply it to your business. Where are you on the S-curve? If you are reaching a breaking point, it could be time to implement something different that will burst you through that ceiling and start you on a new S-curve.

 

 

 

Wait, where’s the “Staples button” because if only it were that easy. When you hire someone new or install new technology or change a process, you trust that it will make      a difference. However, it may be little more than a leap of faith unless you accompany it with talent, procedures, or coaching to support the leap to the next growth curve.

 

So what can be done right now to end the year on a high note? At this late stage, less is more. The best course of action is to reflect on the goals you set at the beginning of the year. Are there any that you identified as integral to the success of the business that are still incomplete? What are your team’s views? Have they identified any items that require your immediate attention? Now is the time to narrow your focus to the critical elements of your original plan. Pick one or two top priorities and implement the necessary changes. Moreover, remember that effective collaboration produces results that are greater than each individual’s contribution. This rule applies to whether you build your team internally  or create a virtual team of external resources. There is still time to amplify your results for 2019.

 

“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”

- Charles Darwin

 

To learn more or speak with Pat, email confidence@thepersonalcoach.ca.

 

Are you looking to grow your business? Save the date for our Generator Event! Tuesday November 26, 2019

 

If you want to grow your advisory business, get this date in your calendar!

Tuesday November 26, 2019, Cambridge, ON.

 

This TPC event is for advisors looking to grow their business, double their revenues and achieve time and money freedom. Full event details and sign up information here: www.tpcgenerator.ca.

 

Alison Ottewell is helping advisors to connect and have an online presence.

 

Digital shouldn't be daunting! Creating a digital  Marketing Strategy that works with your business  is realistic and achievable. Engaging videos, compelling blogs and Social Media success is within your reach. Connect with Alison today at confidence@thepersonalcoach.ca.

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Bridging the communication between advisors and their support staff.

Heather Amlin, Operations & Efficiencies Coach

 

I can’t believe it’s been a year since I started with The Personal Coach. Since starting, I have felt blessed to be able to take the time I needed to figure out how to use my “unique abilities” (cue Art Schooley’s voice inside my head) so I can best help guide advisors and their teams. I also have Fortunato Restagno to thank. He speaks to his branding clients about their compelling story which inspired me to discover my compelling story.


I spent many years in the financial services business as a Marketing and Operations Assistant in the trenches. Subsequently, I was a co-business owner of an advisory firm who purchased 2 other advisory firms. Finally, I became an ex-business owner transitioning clients and myself into a new role with our merger. You can imagine the many hats that needed to be worn for the merger to go smoothly.

 

I’ve really enjoyed the challenges of each role. I have especially loved the fact that each role has given me an opportunity to create processes, procedures and work with advisory support teams. It’s something I am passionate about and I enjoy bridging the communication between advisors and their support staff. With that being said, I’ve decided to focus my coaching on developing better operations and efficiencies with advisory teams.


I know first-hand the challenges an advisor has to deal with. It can be challenging to find time to listen to your support staff without distractions. If both the advisor and the staff member(s) are receiving calls, emails and texts, when do you find the time to get ready for meetings, process paperwork, keep an organized office AND create processes and procedures so that things run smoothly? Every advisory firm is unique and different - from the advisor doing it all themselves to the offices with 2-3 advisors and a support team for each. No matter the size, you still need to have processes and procedures in place. Every person in the office should know what those are, even if they don’t have to use each one.

 

I use a back-office checklist, which focuses on technology, administration, client services, and investment and insurance procedures. Reviewing this with advisory teams has led to great discussions around weaknesses in existing processes and identifying where there are no processes at all. We also review strengths and affirm the areas that are running smoothly.

 

As I embark on my second year with TPC, I’ve expanded this process to include the integration of new employees into an advisor’s office. We call it the Coaching for Integration Success Program. One of the challenges of working in small/medium team environments is how to set your new employees up for success as you try to train them in the many areas of your busy office. Having a clear agenda for their first day, their first week, and their first quarter is a great step! So, I keep Kim Poulin’s motto in mind and off I go….”Hire for attitude, train for skill.”

 

If you would like to speak with Heather to discuss in further detail, please contact us at confidence@thepersonalcoach.ca.

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Too many clients or too many non-ideal clients?

A CASE STUDY ON “RIGHT SIZING” YOUR BUSINESS

 

 

I was invited to speak at a dealer conference to discuss the importance of having the right people around you and how to create a great team. All of the attendees at the conference received a complimentary copy of The Personal Coach booklet, The Right Fit, which is a guide to help advisors make great hires.


At the end of the presentation, “George,” one of the attendees, approached me and asked if I could help him with a hiring project. We booked a conference call for the following week so I could learn more about why he felt that he needed to make a hire for his team, which already consisted of four support staff.

 

During our call, George shared with me that because of his large clientele and significant asset book, his current team could not handle all of the transactions and client requests. George had concluded that he needed to hire another team member.


I asked George one of my favourite questions, “Do you have too many clients or do you have too many non-ideal clients?” George had never heard this question before and asked what I meant. I shared with him that, as coaches, we see many advisors like him building a large clientele. However, as they evolve and mature as a financial advisor, many of the clients do not fit their ideal client profile. I suggested to George that before we move forward with a new hire, we complete an exercise called Best Case Scenario from Cotton Systems. This exercise examines the 10 best sales that an advisor has made over the last 6 to 12 months. George agreed to complete this exercise with the help of his team.

 

At our next meeting, I could tell that George, having completed the Best Case Scenario exercise, had experienced an epiphany. He was happy to have spent time reflecting and better understanding who his top clients are and more importantly, was excited to see how we could apply this information to his business model. We used the information from the exercise and completed an Ideal Client Profile (ICP), which we committed to paper. We referred to this for the next exercise by starting to use this ICP as part of our referral/introduction process.

 

I asked George, “Tell me about how you’ve built your contact management system and when it was last updated?” George said that he has a program called Act! and has been using the system for 8 years. I shared with George that a contact management system is not just a technology tool. It needs to be viewed as a business process encompassing 4 steps:

 

  1. Segmentation
  2. Building a relationship management strategy for each segment
  3. Identifying a champion to manage the system
  4. Using technology to manage the process – in this case,
  5. it was Act!

George said, “This is all fine but I really need your help in making a hire.” I said to George that I understood this but before we made a hire, we needed to “right size” his practice. I shared with him a number of stories where we had completed this exercise with advisors with large clienteles and in many cases, the advisor decided to right size the practice and by doing so, decided that he/she did not need to make an additional hire. I asked George to go along with me on this one and work on his contact management system before we discuss hiring. George begrudgingly agreed to take this step. I then showed him some sample customized segmentation scorecards that we had created for other clients and I suggested that we build a customized segmentation scorecard for him. He agreed and we built this scorecard with a particular focus on the following items:

 
  • Size of assets
  • Future potential
  • Coachability
  • How clients value the services
  • The client history of providing referrals
  • Occupation status
  • Family income

One of our support team members at TPC created a scorecard with the above items and a rating system to grade each client from 1 to 5. We had 7 items with the maximum score on each item being 5, which meant that the best client score could be 35. We then created a rating system using the numbers so that we could create 5 different segments – platinum, gold, silver, bronze and lead. I left this exercise for George and his team to complete and within a month, George sent me an email outlining that he had the following clients in each segment:

 

Platinum clients – 21
Gold clients – 147
Silver clients – 101
Bronze clients – 174
Lead clients – 57

 

With this exercise behind us, I arranged to book my next face-to-face coaching meeting with George and asked him to have his employee responsible for booking appointments to join the meeting. This employee, “Kathy,“ is very engaged in the business and was quite intrigued with what we were going to achieve during this meeting.

 

Next, we built a relationship management strategy with each segment. I showed Kathy and George some sample relationship management strategies. We spent the balance of the morning outlining a relationship management strategy that Kathy thought she could implement for each of the segments. Our most concentrated relationship management strategy would be focused on Platinum clients and minimal for Bronze and Lead clients. As part of this exercise, I asked for names of clients that fit in each of these categories so George and Kathy could think about these clients when delivering their strategy. Putting client names to the categories helped us immensely in creating strategies for each segment.

 

The third step in building the contact management system is identifying a champion. Kathy was up for the challenge and she was excited that she had clarity around managing clients going forward.

 

The next step after completing this project was to focus on helping with a new hire. George was no longer as eager to work on this project because he discovered what so many advisors discover after this exercise – he felt that a number of clients should be sold off because they did not fit the ideal client profile and decided he wanted to focus on “right sizing” his business.

 

After having a thorough review of the business, not surprisingly, George and Kathy determined they could sell off 25% of their clientele. This would only reduce their revenue by 10% and then they could focus on bringing in more Platinum and Gold clients. We helped identify advisors that would be interested in buying these clients.

 

At the next meeting, we shared with the full team what we had been doing. After announcing that we had right sized the business, the other team members were in total agreement with selling off 25% of the clientele. Guess what happened next? They decided that adding a new team member was no longer necessary if they pulled the trigger on the sale!


I suggested to George that we take a coaching break and give the team time to implement what we agreed upon. I followed up in six months and George shared with me that he had almost replaced the 10% of lost revenue because he was now focused on his best clients. Additionally, those best clients are providing him with introductions to people just like them. His team is now more energized, has less stress and everyone is feeling like they are running the business whereas previously, they felt like the business was running them.

 

Good advisors do an excellent job of building their clientele but quite often, they do not take the time to review their clientele and see if these clients are a good fit for their current practice. Also, some advisors have “FOMO” - a fear of missing out. In other words, they think that they will miss opportunities if they release some of their non-ideal clients when in fact they will find more opportunities when adding Platinum clients in their place.

 

Please contact us at confidence@thepersonalcoach.ca if you would like to speak with a coach about right sizing your business.

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Creating Effective, Productive Teams

Insights on how a team is using Everything DiSC® Workplace assessments to create business momentum

 

Do you believe one of your biggest assets if not the biggest, is your team? If you said yes, so do we which is why at The Personal Coach, we have a process in place to help teams grow stronger. We use Everything DiSC® profiles from Wiley, which are a personalized, specialized and in-depth analysis used to help individuals develop a broader understanding of themselves, their relationships with team members, explore their own potential and realize unparalleled success.

 

Everything DiSC® profiles help to develop critical business skills such as:

  • Leadership
  • Teamwork
  • Communication
  • Management
  • Sales

In a team building session, we discuss the results of the assessments and when needed, coach people one-on-one to assist with implementing the necessary behavioural changes. We recently received feedback from a valued client of ours who uses DiSC Workplace to manage their large team. Keep in mind that DiSC is for teams of all sizes. In their case, they have many team members with different personalities and profiles. So, they have benefited from understanding each other's personalities to best work with each team member.

 

Our client assigned one team member to be the DiSC® Team Leader to make sure that DiSC was not getting lost in the day-to-day to-dos and was remaining an important aspect of their business that they focused on regularly. 

 

Here is what the DiSC® Team Leader shared with us:

 

THE IMPACT ON THE TEAM, As an organization, it’s the best thing we could’ve done. Since doing the DiSC® profiles for all the team members, we are much more aware and sensitive to each person’s unique communication and work style. We know that different people prefer, and need, different types of communication. We have incorporated DiSC® discussions into our staff meetings every month to make sure team communication and effectiveness remains top of mind for each team member. Since doing DiSC®, it has also motivated us to do even further research on communication styles and working with different styles. We use DiSC® profiles to facilitate better understanding between team members. Sometimes team members with different DiSC® styles can feel like they are not on the “same page” but having another person in the meeting who understands the different styles can help validate people’s feelings and their reactions to certain scenarios. On each employee’s door frame or work station, we have posted “How to Work with Me” so everyone can be reminded about how to work most effectively with their colleagues. The team is encouraged, on a yearly basis, to update this if anything changes in their preferences. We use terms like “Bring out your inner D” (dominance) or “pull it back when communicating with someone who is not a high D.” Not only does everyone know everyone else’s styles but they understand themselves better which only helps team and individual growth.

 

AS THE TEAM GROWS, Whenever we have a new staff member, we have them complete a DiSC® profile. I go through a detailed account of our initial introduction to DiSC, why we went through it and how it’s helped us to better work together and be a more cohesive team. Once the profile comes back, I discuss it with the new hire. Most people, when they get them back, are surprised at how precise the results are. I also order comparison reports for the new hire and for the people who will be working closely with them. It helps me to identify any issues that could potentially come up. It’s a proactive move so I can have conversations with existing staff prior to the new person starting work.

 

We are happy to see the benefits that our clients have realized from working with our coaches and Everything DiSC® profiles. If you are a business leader with a team, big or small, you will benefit from Everything DiSC® profiles combined with coaching.

 

You will discover:

  • what your priorities are at work
  • what you are motivated by
  • what stressors you likely have
  • what people will notice about you
  • what your limitations may be
  • what your communication needs are

 

Your team will:

  • have better communication
  • better understand one another
  • realize increased productivity
  • realize increased performance
  • improve the hiring process
  • leverage each member’s skills

 

Please reach out if you would like any further information. 

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