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Team Motivation

Originally published in FORUM MAGAZINE

 

How can you keep your team inspired and focused during a pandemic? Kim Poulin walks us through a plan of attack

 

Welcome to 2021. The year may have changed but the uncertainty in our working environment remains. More emphasis is being placed on employee wellness and mental health because of the direct impact that the workplace environment can have on a person’s health.

 

With the ongoing pandemic, some may wonder if workplace health and motivation is as significant a concern now that many people are working apart. The truth is, it has never been more important to focus on employee wellness and maintaining an effective, cohesive team — yet it has never been more challenging to achieve such a thing.

 

How can we possibly improve our culture and team cohesion when we are apart or are pulled in too many directions due to the demands put upon us in COVID times? I am a team coach focused on building team effectiveness and productivity. I am a Certified Facilitator & Authorized Partner with Everything DiSC® & Five Behaviors®. I understand that many teams (not all) are feeling like they are in survival mode.In this state, it’s difficult to embrace opportunities to improve your culture,but there are a few rather easy things that you can implement so that your team can have an amazing year.

 

Let’s start with the challenges. Despite your best intentions during the pandemic, it can be very difficult to manage and support your employees the way you would like. Here are some challenges we have witnessed amongst advisors: • I worry about my staff, especially those who live alone. • I wonder if they are getting enough accomplished. • I don’t want them to become virtually fatigued. • I am concerned about the mental health of one or more of my employees. • I don’t want to lose business momentum. • I’ m struggling because I can’t talk to them as much as before. Here are some challenges employees tell us they are having: • I’m not entirely sure what my employer wants day to day. • It’s harder for me to work virtually. • I’m stressed about my children being home and balancing their e-learning. • I don’t feel as motivated as before. • I don’t have a proper space to concentrate. • I don’t think I’ m working as productively with my team members. • I’m not sure how to balance my job and checking in with team members/my employer.

 

How can you improve your team motivation, culture, and cohesion virtually?

 

1. Get feedback from your team members.

Here are some questions to ask your team members to get a basic sense of how they are doing and how team communication could improve. You can send these questions out via email and request they respond by email, or you can send them out and follow up with a phone/video meeting to get more detailed responses. With their permission, it would be worthwhile to share the teams’ responses so that each person understands their coworkers’ preferences and challenges. This is also important information to know for when the pandemic is deemed over.

 

1. What do you need to feel good while working from home? 2. If given the choice, what is your ideal balance between working on site and working from home? a. I get so much more done at home b. I prefer to be on site c. I prefer a 50/50 mix d. Other 3. What is your biggest challenge working on a virtual team? a. Not enough time to interact with the team b. I feel like I’m always on the clock and can’t shut it off c. Communication can be a hassle and is limited d. Other

 

Team Focused

 

1. What changes occurred during COVID that have improved efficiency and will continue in the new norm? 2. For you, is effective, rewarding teamwork easier or more challenging on a virtual team compared to an in-person team? 3. What aspects of teamwork are easier or better when working virtually? 4. What aspects of teamwork are more challenging or less effective when working virtually?

 

2. Gain a deeper understanding of your team members’ motivations.

Along with knowing each employee’ s talents, career aspirations, professional development needs, and communication style (which we recommend), you also need to know what motivates them. People are motivated by different things. Two ways to determine one’s motivations include simply asking them questions about motivation, and secondly, by using assessment tools such as Everything DiSC® The Five Behaviours®.

 

Many people are motivated by extrinsic items like money or time off, but let’s focus on intrinsic motivation, also known as psychic income, which everyone has. These are things that your employee takes satisfaction in. The list is inexhaustive, but examples include prestige; working in a stable, predictable environment; solving problems; catching errors or flaws in design; achieving efficient results; being able to work closely with colleagues; giving and receiving praise; initiating projects; and inspiring others, to name a few.

 

As a side note, knowing the opposite of motivators is just as important. Let’s call these stressors. Examples of stressors include having little independence or private time, being forced to mingle with strangers, following inefficient procedures, dealing with a chaotic environment, being in a dull or unsocial environment, and working without clear guidelines.

 

With personal assessment tools, you can develop a deep understanding of your team members’ intrinsic motivators, which can have a dramatic impact on how you work with your employees and how your employees work together. Job satisfaction is key at the best of times and leads to overall wellness.

 

Let’s say Sarah and Tim work on your team. Sarah is friendly, outgoing, and thrives on building relationships and being around people. She is motivated by working closely with her colleagues — an intrinsic motivation that has likely been disrupted. As Sarah’s leader, you may want to touch base with her daily and have her focus on interacting with clients whenever possible.

 

Tim is motivated by giving and receiving praise, which typically would happen in a public setting at the office. He is always encouraging the team to work harder to reach the end goal. As the team’ s leader, consider implementing a “team success ” update at the start of each virtual team meeting that he and the other team members can look forward to. Discuss how certain successes (no matter how small) have propelled the business forward, and encourage ideas to keep that momentum going.

 

3. Provide regular and consistent communication.

Hold team meetings and one-on-one meetings, especially if a team member is more likely to express themselves speaking to you alone.

 

Team members may have specific preferences when they can do a virtual meeting. Find out by asking. Be flexible in the timing if necessary.

 

Encourage those who may not be as tech savvy to log in 10 minutes before a meeting to get set up properly so meetings can start when planned and they don ’t feel disruptive.

 

Limit team meetings to two hours. Our team finds that after two hours of screen time, we need to take a break. Offer a fiveminute coffee/bathroom break every hour. A best practice now is to have two shorter team meetings each week. If you have more than one employee, encourage team members to collaborate on video meetings at other times without you when possible.

 

4. If you need to hire, you can.

Some teams that have fully embraced a virtual model say it has positively impacted their business. So much so that they have been able to make hires virtually, and have needed to because their business has been growing with new clients and others requiring more services. There has been upward momentum in hiring since the fall of 2020. I am currently assisting six advisor teams to make hires. We will do three to four video interviews, and most teams will find a safe way to meet in person near the end of the hiring process, whether having a physically distanced walk in a park, or having the whole team meet in a parking lot.

 

In the interviewing process, ask a few questions to uncover what motivates them and have them do some sort of an assessment. Here are some examples of questions you can ask. 1. Describe the work environment or culture in which you are the most productive and happy. 2. What, in your experience, motivates your best, most successful job performance? Can you give us an example of this motivation in action in the workplace? 3. How do you ensure that your personal level of motivation is high on a daily basis?

 

If you have an employee who is motivated to inspire others, consider them to mentor your new hire. Doing a few icebreaker games during your virtual team meetings will help everyone to get to know each other. And again, doing an assessment such as Everything DiSC will fast-track the understanding of each other’ s behaviours, communication styles, and motivators and stressors.

 

When you know what motivates your employees it doesn’t matter if you are apart. You can utilize each person’s energy for the betterment of the business, and the employees will be happier for it. You simply need to take the time to investigate.

 

Do you want to bring out the best in each of your employees and start working more effectively - even when apart? See if your team is a fit for a virtual workshop.

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Celebrating your wins

Taking Time to Celebrate Wins

February is a busy month for financial advisors so rather than provide tips and resources, we are celebrating our clients' accomplishments. It is truly amazing watching what happens when clients commit to their goals and achieve their vision. Here are the milestones we've tracked.

 

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Effective team meetings

Originally published Oct 2014. Revised in February 2021. 

 

Effective Team Meetings

 

“Meetings are indispensable when you don’t want to do anything.” 

- John Kenneth Galbraith

 

Many people share Mr. Galbraith’s view of meetings – they are often seen as a waste of time and they can be if not structured properly. When you have a team of two or more people however, meetings are a key part of effective communication in an office.

 

Here are some tips to make your meetings a more productive use of your time: 

 

1) Have a set time for your team meetings and schedule them in your calendar for the year. For example, day long annual planning meeting, quarterly team meetings and weekly meetings. If you are doing virtual meetings, plan them in 2-hour spans to avoid zoom fatigue.

 

2) Find a day of the week and time of day when energy levels are high. Tuesday morning meetings often work well. Consider each team member's convenience. 

 

3) Have an agenda for every meeting with a clear outcome. If you like a sample, let us know.

 

5) Set a time limit for meetings so people stay on point.

 

6) Build in team accountability. You can use a worksheet or shared to-do list which has key responsibilities, time frames and have each team member report on their own items to ensure everyone is involved.

 

7) Hold the meeting even if the whole team isn’t there. Even if the lead advisor is away, the remaining team members should still get together to touch base on things.

 

8) Have someone record minutes even if only in point form.

 

9) Add some variety (i.e. guest speaker on a topic that is relevant to the group, training on software, or watching a short TED talk). 

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Advisors in Growth Mode

Advisors are back in growth mode and building up their teams

 

BY HELEN BURNETT-NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

UPDATED DECEMBER 16, 2020

 

If you have a Globe and Mail account you can view the article here. 

 

Otherwise, see below for key takeaways. 

 

Volatility and uncertainty during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic brought a forced pause to the year’s plans for most Canadians and businesses – financial advisors included. But several advisors have chosen to shift back into growth mode carefully in recent months as client demand has put their plans for strategic long-term expansion come back into focus.

 

April-Lynn Levitt, a business coach for financial advisors with The Personal Coach in Oakville, Ont., says that while many of her advisor clients were initially waiting to gauge the impact of the pandemic on revenue and growth, several have added team members over the past few months. She says advisors have shifted from reactive to proactive mode as demand from clients increases.

 

Many advisors were surprised by the success of the virtual model with both existing and new clients and see this as an opportunity to grow strategically, focusing on where they need to augment their service offering, Ms. Levitt says.

 

“If you have the mindset that, ‘Yes, we can do business this way in this new environment,’ then those type of advisors have been really exceeding,” she says.

 

The virtual nature of business at the moment should not prevent firms from bringing on extra team members as long as expansion makes sense strategically and financially, Ms. Levitt says.

 

At the same time, expanding an advisory firm successfully in the COVID-19 era requires clarity and communication beyond what may have been necessary previously, as the face-to-face component of bringing a new team member on board is missing, she says.

 

“It’s even more important to have all the things you would have in a normal hiring process, like a very clear job description and responsibilities, a very clear onboarding process and training schedule,” Ms. Levitt says.

 

Please connect if you have any questions about growing in 2021!

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'Tis the Season for Business Planning

'Tis the Season for Business Planning 

 

Recharge your business in 2021

 

Do you have a business plan? Better yet, would you say it's comprehensive; having strategies, vision, goals with action plans and timelines? 

So why plan? Well, simply put, what gets written down gets remembered, what gets scheduled gets completed, what gets measured gets improved! Also consider how business planning efforts will help your clients achieve their goals.

 

To start, complete a Year-End Review and ask yourself the following questions. Don't forget to get your team involved. 

 

1. What were our goals in 2020 and did we achieve them?

2. What went really well this year? 

3. What was missing last year or needed to be improved?

4. What were the opportunities and challenges?

5. What were the pain points?

6. How can we do more for our clients?

7. How can we do more for our team? 

 

Keep in mind that an effective plan:

  • Is dynamic and should be adjusted when necessary
  • Is simple to understand
  • Includes quantifiable tasks
  • Is reviewed regularly
  • Holds you and your team accountable

 

Contact us to book a complimentary call

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Strength in Numbers

 

Having spent over 30 years in the financial services industry, I have found two things to be true; everything and nothing has changed with the day-to-day challenges advisors face.

 

Everything has changed with technology and moving from paper to electronic, regulatory requirements, fee disclosure, anti-spam requirements, the amount of back-end support, medical underwriting, saturated marketplace and competition, and the list goes on.

 

Nothing has changed with one simple fact; advisors need support to survive and thrive.

 

I’ve always enjoyed working with financial advisors. My most satisfying experiences have come from helping advisors turn their businesses from struggling to thriving. Being an advisor can be a lonely business, and often the piece of the puzzle that’s missing is having someone in your corner.

Since joining The Personal coach last Spring, I’ve been implementing practice management strategies into advisors’ businesses. It’s also been a privilege to be featured in Forum Magazine discussing COI relationships, representing the team at Advocis meetings, and addressing closed audience sessions with Faith Life Financial. Coming up next is sharing insights on understanding your finances at our Fall TPC GeneratorTM event.

 

Having The Personal Coach’s support to pursue my adventure is motivating and exciting. Most importantly, I’ve had the pleasure of being part of an incredible team that leaves no stone unturned with the depth and breadth of their expertise. The Personal Coach has fantastic resources; HR support, team development, succession planning, marketing, and branding.  As a team, we provide full-spectrum support for advisors. We often refer to ourselves as an extension of an advisor’s team. It’s rare to find a support team that has so many arrows in the quiver. This allows me to start each day with enthusiasm to help advisors find their way and fully develop their businesses and enjoy the fruits of their labours. I believe strongly that success in business is more likely to be achieved and, more importantly - savoured if it’s integrated with a fulfilling personal life. When we work together and clear out the clutter, we achieve success.

 

Our office has been working with Pat Giesbrecht for the past six months, and I am so happy with the results we are getting. We have completed many projects; DISC profiles, re-segmentation, written procedures, Contact Management changes, new technology implemented, job descriptions reviewed and solidified, the opportunity for all to share our progress, challenges, and successes. The best part is the teamwork this has inspired, the sharing, the helping and overall coming together for a common goal. It’s been far more comfortable for us to share the workload when our goals were clear.  The staff took much of it on, were accountable, and excited about the changes.

-    Monteith Financial Group

 

To hear more or speak with Pat directly, please email us at confidence@thepersonalcoach.ca

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Shifting Gears

 

From a degree in Geology to a career as a Business Consultant later a Financial Advisor, Sandra Schmidt has always been a master of change. Now, she embraces her most recent endeavor - retirement.

 

A native of London, Ontario, Sandra describes her upbringing as akin to a Norman Rockwell painting. The third of four girls, Sandra, reflects on her childhood as warm and loving. Her father was an actuary with London Life and her mother, trained as a teacher, chose to be a stay-at-home mom, as did many of that generation. Attending church was a big part of Sandra’s childhood, given that her father was a soloist in the choir, and her mother ran the Sunday school. Mostly, Sandra recalls both parents always encouraging their daughters to find their passion, to do it well and to remember that in life, there are no limitations – you can do anything you choose.

 

Inspired by her parents’ words, after Sandra graduated from high school she followed her father’s example and attended university at Western. There she received her Bachelor’s degree in Geology. A short stint in the Arctic, however, convinced Sandra that spending over half of each year in remote locations wasn’t all that appealing. She decided that a business education might be a path to consider and returned to Western, this time as a student in the Business program. It is here she met the love of her life, Duff Schmidt,

who hailed from the Okanagan in British Columbia. By January of the following year, the couple knew wherever they would go; they would go together. When asked how they decided between British Columbia and Ontario, Sandra says, “Duff said he wanted to be where the skiing was, so

away we went to Vancouver!”

 

Almost directly out of school, Duff started with Mutual Life in the Estate and Financial Planning Services (EFPS) area. Sandra accompanied him to various corporate events and conventions, and it was there she began to notice the

opportunities available in the financial services industry. Through the years, Sandra continued to develop close relationships with management at the local branch of what is now Sun Life Financial, who would consistently tell her,

“When you get tired of what you’re doing, come and work for us.” Fast forward five years, Sandra knew it was time for a change and left her role in Strategic Planning consulting and in June 2000, her career as a Financial Advisor began.

 

Though a logical and natural transition, Sandra describes the first few years as an Advisor being “really tough.” Similar to what most advisors experience, Sandra also quickly exhausted her natural market. Prospecting was tough and, in need of people to talk to, she developed a game plan that was strategic and proactive. Scouring her Rolodex, Sandra approached individuals who were well-placed HR managers and could get her in the door for a 45-minute “workplace solutions” presentation. Attendance was high during these

sessions, and Sandra’s genuine approach and willingness to invest her time with clients resonated well and served as a foundation for her future success. At that time, the Financial Centre offered a mentorship program that paired new advisors with more tenured campaigners. It was during this program where Sandra met Al. Al not only served as Sandra’s mentor but soon became her friend and eventual business partner. In 2005, with the

partnership flourishing, they moved to a new location in downtown Vancouver.

 

In 2008, Al was approaching retirement and in the early stage of his succession plan, which included transitioning out of the individual business. Sandra had already been helping to service many of Al’s clients over the past several years; still, the formal transition was a significant change and Sandra felt that she needed some additional guidance and support. She reached out to a colleague who had been in a similar situation who referred her to The Personal Coach. Sandra says she has always treated her business like a business, but working with Juli Leith offered her a very different perspective on how best to organize, structure and manage her practice. This new relationship eventually led to an even higher level of success for Sandra. “Working with Juli ensured that I didn’t simply double how hard I worked just

because I had doubled my business” Sandra reflects. With her business bustling, ensuring her work-life balance became an even more significant challenge and necessity. At the end of each busy day, Sandra would come home, kick off her heels and sit on the floor in the kitchen and talk to her dog, Molly. “I would tell her all about my day - she won’t share my secrets.” Sandra’s business would continue to grow and flourish and the next 11 years flew by.

 

During the summers, Sandra and Duff would take some much-needed downtime to recharge their batteries. In 2017, Sandra found that she was growing increasingly less enthusiastic about returning to work. That’s when she knew it was time to start thinking about and planning for her succession strategy. Sandra’s daughter, Leigh, had worked for Sandra’s team as a summer student while studying business at the University of Victoria. Also, Leigh had covered a year of maternity leave for one of the staff. When asked if she would consider becoming an advisor, Leigh replied: “no thanks” – déjà vu from when Sandra was first asked! Leigh and her husband John followed their dreams and moved to New Zealand for two years for John to pursue a degree in winemaking. After returning to Canada, they settled in the Okanagan wine region, and Leigh decided the timing was right and pursued a career as a Sun Life Advisor. She has since taken on Sandra’s Okanagan clients as well as Lower Mainland clients Leigh was already supporting. The balance of her business transferred to colleagues whom Sandra had worked with for years. Citing as the vital element to choosing a successor, “We  already had a great rapport, I knew who they were and what their values were. I knew my clients would receive the same level of integrity and respect

as I had shown them”. Sandra is so proud of Leigh and the Vancouver advisors. After her clients had moved to their respective new advisors, Sandra stayed on for three months to ensure it was a smooth transition. In May of 2019, Sandra officially retired. She has since run into former clients and receives emails and cards saying thank you for picking such great advisors to carry on the legacy.

 

Receiving accolades from her clients isn’t surprising. You only have to hear Sandra speak about her time as an advisor to understand how she cherished the relationships she built. She had several families where she serviced four generations! In her own words, Sandra shares, “It is such a privilege and

honor to participate in a small way in a family’s life – and with such an intimate topic. To be a steward is such an honor”. Reflecting on one family in particular, Sandra can’t help but become emotional. In 2004, the file of two clients was passed on to her - a husband and wife. Eventually, she gained the business of his mother, and then their children and grandchildren, too. One year, Sandra noticed a change with the wife; that she didn’t seem herself. It was then, when the client was in her early 50’s, that she received a diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer’s. Amid this turmoil, it was comforting that the planning work done with Sandra allowed the husband to take his retirement early to care for his wife up until her passing. When asked what her guiding principle is, Sandra humbly shares, “you must have a solid sense of what is right and wrong. Be kind to one another and do the right thing. Show up when you’re supposed to show up and mostly, be the advisor you’d like to have”. What started as an attraction to business turned into a genuine love for people. “I had no idea how much I would fall in love with the clients. It was never about me; it was always about them”. For anyone thinking about becoming an advisor, Sandra shares the following sage advice “be prepared for the roller coaster. It’s not easy, and there are two tracks on the roller coaster; emotional and financial – they go hand in hand. Know what an honor it is. Clients will tell you things they won’t share with others; it’s all about trust”.

 

“What we do as advisors matters.”

 

Since May, Sandra has been enjoying every moment of retirement. She reflects, “I used to hear from retired people and they would tell me how busy they were, and I wondered, how can they be so busy? I don’t wonder that anymore!” With Duff also retiring in the Fall of 2018, their days are spent

enjoying the outdoors, loving time with their expanding family, reconnecting with friends, traveling and truly living in the present.

 

Sandra, on behalf of The Personal Coach, congratulations on a magnificent career and your retirement!
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Trust. A Key Element For Success

 

Trust. A Key Element In The Formula For Success.

 

Every once in a while, thankfully not that often, we get a stark reminder of the one factor that is so very critical to building a sustainable advisory practice: TRUST. It is fundamental to client acquisition and developing those clients into positive long-term relationships. Our view, of course, is that trust has to be “table stakes” as you build and manage your practice and that it is a currency to be fiercely guarded by yourself, your organization, and your suppliers.

 

In his book, The Speed of Trust, Stephen M.R. Covey offers many great thoughts about trust that might serve as food for thought on the topic.

First, the reality is that where trust is high, it increases speed and lowers cost. Where trust is low, it reduces speed and increases the cost. For an advisory practice, that often means ensuring that you have the right people in the right roles working with strong knowledge and well-developed practices and procedures.

 

That trusted formula is: (Strategy x Execution) x Trust = Results

The element of trust can be a tax or a dividend and, clearly, distrust has a cost attached to it. If your team members, or yourself, don’t trust your knowledge, your processes, or each other, the cost can be high.

It’s worth saying that self-trust is a crucial factor; if you don’t trust you, why would anyone else?

 

As you think about this topic, keep in mind that there are four critical elements to trust:

 

1. Integrity: Be honest, stand by your principles, and do what you say you’ll do. Increasing integrity starts with making and keeping commitments to yourself, standing for something, and being open.

2. Intent: Have good, positive motives. Let those motives inform and populate your agenda and ultimately, your behavior. You can continuously examine and adjust your motives and declare your intent.

3. Capabilities: Develop knowledge and abilities that evoke confidence and keep learning! Covey suggests that we use the acronym TASKS (Talents, Attitudes, Skills, Knowledge, Style) as we think about capabilities. Always be working on your TASKS. Increase your capabilities by running with your strengths, keeping yourself relevant, and knowing where you’re going.

4. Results: Establish a track record. Results are an indicator of how well you are doing in the other vital areas and you can think of them as the fruits of your efforts. They can also give you credibility. So, take responsibility for your results, expect to win and finish strong.

 

There is much more to the trust conversation but it all starts with ourselves. Looking inwards before pointing fingers elsewhere can often set the tone for making positive impacts.

 

At The Personal Coach, we utilize our Velocity IndicatorTM as an exercise for self-assessment on your business practice. We couple that with a Complimentary Consultation which confirms and clarifies some of your thinking and potential next steps. We believe that the advisory business can be a very lonely one when it comes to managing and leading your practice and it is beneficial for you to have a sounding board and another set of eyes and ears to help you set your course.

 

To learn more about your business and where you fall on the trust scale, request our Velocity IndicatorTM exercise by connecting at confidence@thepersonalcoach.ca.

 

 

Heather Amlin is helping teams address gaps in their processes and workflow.

 

Our Operations and Efficiencies Coach, Heather, has created a Back Office Checklist to identify the gaps in advisor team processes and workflow. Heather has divided the Checklist into 3 key areas; Technology, Office Procedures and Client Services. When is the last time you reviewed your own processes? The timing could be perfect to finish the year strong. Book your back office assessment with Heather today! 

 

Welcoming our newest team member.

The Personal Coach team has grown again! Our Marketing Specialist, Kelly Maxwell, delivered a beautiful boy this month. Welcome to the world Parker Michael Maxwell and congratulations to Kelly, Paul and big sister Aubrey. 

 

Are you looking to grow your business? Save the date for our Generator Event! Tuesday November 26, 2019

 

This TPC event is for advisors who are looking to grow their business, double their revenues, and achieve time and money freedom. For full event details and registration information, visit www.tpcgenerator.ca. 

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Bridging the communication between advisors and their support staff.

Heather Amlin, Operations & Efficiencies Coach

 

I can’t believe it’s been a year since I started with The Personal Coach. Since starting, I have felt blessed to be able to take the time I needed to figure out how to use my “unique abilities” (cue Art Schooley’s voice inside my head) so I can best help guide advisors and their teams. I also have Fortunato Restagno to thank. He speaks to his branding clients about their compelling story which inspired me to discover my compelling story.


I spent many years in the financial services business as a Marketing and Operations Assistant in the trenches. Subsequently, I was a co-business owner of an advisory firm who purchased 2 other advisory firms. Finally, I became an ex-business owner transitioning clients and myself into a new role with our merger. You can imagine the many hats that needed to be worn for the merger to go smoothly.

 

I’ve really enjoyed the challenges of each role. I have especially loved the fact that each role has given me an opportunity to create processes, procedures and work with advisory support teams. It’s something I am passionate about and I enjoy bridging the communication between advisors and their support staff. With that being said, I’ve decided to focus my coaching on developing better operations and efficiencies with advisory teams.


I know first-hand the challenges an advisor has to deal with. It can be challenging to find time to listen to your support staff without distractions. If both the advisor and the staff member(s) are receiving calls, emails and texts, when do you find the time to get ready for meetings, process paperwork, keep an organized office AND create processes and procedures so that things run smoothly? Every advisory firm is unique and different - from the advisor doing it all themselves to the offices with 2-3 advisors and a support team for each. No matter the size, you still need to have processes and procedures in place. Every person in the office should know what those are, even if they don’t have to use each one.

 

I use a back-office checklist, which focuses on technology, administration, client services, and investment and insurance procedures. Reviewing this with advisory teams has led to great discussions around weaknesses in existing processes and identifying where there are no processes at all. We also review strengths and affirm the areas that are running smoothly.

 

As I embark on my second year with TPC, I’ve expanded this process to include the integration of new employees into an advisor’s office. We call it the Coaching for Integration Success Program. One of the challenges of working in small/medium team environments is how to set your new employees up for success as you try to train them in the many areas of your busy office. Having a clear agenda for their first day, their first week, and their first quarter is a great step! So, I keep Kim Poulin’s motto in mind and off I go….”Hire for attitude, train for skill.”

 

If you would like to speak with Heather to discuss in further detail, please contact us at confidence@thepersonalcoach.ca.

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New Hiring Programs

Our Coaches, Kim and Heather, have been working away on further developing our hiring and integration programs offered to advisors and their teams. Hiring a team member can be a long and onerous task, especially without guidance or experience. We have discovered that many advisors prefer someone else handling certain aspects of the process – and often, the entire process. Our hiring programs allow you to continue to focus on what you do best and delegate the hiring to us. We become an extension of your team - your human resources and hiring team!


Key elements of the coaching process include, attracting, hiring, retaining and compensating the right team members; understanding each team member’s competencies, skills and responsibilities; having each person in the right role and building team effectiveness, efficiency and cohesiveness.

 

Services available include:
  • Identifying the candidate pool
  • Narrowing the candidate pool
  • Due diligence – screening final candidates

We also have a Coaching for Integration Success Program that will help you hit the ground running from day one with your new hire. Your customized program includes the following:

  • A copy of the Right Fit II Booklet - Integration and Development of a New Team Member
  • A customized agenda to follow for your employee’s first day and their first week
  • A comprehensive training checklist with a focus on the first 3 months of your employee’s development
  • On-site training the first day followed by video conference/phone and email consultation with the advisor, training team and the new employee, as required

Failure to hire right can be very expensive and time consuming. To learn more about these exciting services and how to hire and integrate an exceptional team member, please connect at confidence@thepersonalcoach.ca.

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Contributors

Kim Poulin, Business Coach
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